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Publish Date : Wednesday 19 April 2017 - 12:52
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Theresa May defends decision to hold snap general election
British Prime Minister Theresa May waits for European Council President Donald Tusk outside 10 Downing street in central London, on April 6, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
 
British Prime Minister Theresa May waits for European Council President Donald Tusk outside 10 Downing street in central London, on April 6, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
 
Islam Times - British Prime Minister Theresa May has defended her decision to hold a snap general election one day after the surprise announcement.
 
An early election will bolster the UK’s position in talks over Brexit and is in the country’s national interest, May told BBC Radio 4’s Today program on Wednesday.

 
“I want this country to be able to play the strongest hand possible in those negotiations to get the best possible deal because that’s in our long-term interests,” she said.

 
“That’s what this is about, it’s about asking the people to trust me, to trust us in government, to give us that mandate to go and get that really good deal for the UK.”

 
On Tuesday, May called for an early general election to be held on June 8 as the UK is preparing for negotiations on leaving the European Union.

 
She told the BBC that opponents were planning to frustrate "the Brexit process," even after Parliament authorized talks with the EU.

 
"Brexit isn't just about the letter that says we want to leave. It's about ... getting the right deal from Europe."

 
Parliament is set to vote Wednesday on whether to hold an early election.

 
May's aides said she would turn down any invitation to take part in televised debates with fellow party leaders, a decision opposition Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn has harshly criticized.

 
When asked about her reason, May said, “I believe in campaigns in which politicians actually go out and meet the voters.”

 
The decision marks a departure from her predecessor David Cameron, who took part in high-profile election debates in 2010 and 2015.
 
Story Code: 629053